36 days in Snowdonia National Park Itinerary

Make it your trip
Train to Bangor (Gwynedd), Taxi to Llanberis
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Llanberis
— 16 nights
Drive
2
Bala
— 19 nights
Drive

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Llanberis — 16 nights

Explore Llanberis' surroundings by going to Betws-y-Coed (Alison Bradley Gallery, Zip World Fforest, &more), Llanrhychwyn Church (in Llanrhychwyn) and Trefriw (Llyn Geirionydd & Fairy Falls Waterfall).

For ratings, other places to visit, reviews, and other tourist information, use the Llanberis trip maker website.

London to Llanberis is an approximately 4.5-hour combination of train and taxi. You can also drive; or do a combination of train, taxi, and flight. In January in Llanberis, expect temperatures between 9°C during the day and 4°C at night. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 30th (Sun) so you can go by car to Bala.
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Parks · Nature · Outdoors · Historic Sites
Side Trips
Find places to stay Jan 14 — 30:

Bala — 19 nights

Bala is a market town and community in Gwynedd, Wales. Get out of town with these interesting Bala side-trips: Penmaenpool Toll Bridge (in Penmaenpool), Harlech (St Tanwg's Church, Harlech Beach, &more) and Dolgellau (The Mawddach Trail, Cymer Abbey, &more). Next up on the itinerary: explore the activities along Llyn Tegid, head outdoors with Antur Stiniog, take in nature's colorful creations at Caerau Gardens, and enjoy the sand and surf at Aberdyfi Beach.

To see traveler tips, where to stay, maps, and tourist information, read our Bala trip app.

Drive from Llanberis to Bala in 1.5 hours. Alternatively, you can drive. Expect a daytime high around 9°C in January, and nighttime lows around 2°C. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 18th (Fri) so you can go by car back home.
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Parks · Historic Sites · Nature · Outdoors
Side Trips
Find places to stay Jan 30 — Feb 18:

Snowdonia National Park travel guide

4.3
Zipline · Mountains · Waterfalls
Unlike national parks in other countries, is made up of both public and private lands, serving as a permanent home to over 26,000 people. This is the largest national park in Wales, boasting the highest mountain in England and Wales. Dotted by numerous picturesque villages, the park is steeped in local history and culture. One of the wettest parts of the British Isles, the park shelters a diverse plant and animal life, with many areas protected by local and European conservation laws. The area includes over 2,300 km (1,500 mi) of public footpaths, with numerous secluded mountain walks that are relatively empty of hikers and offer peaceful views of the surrounding landscape.
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